Hi and welcome! This is another art gallery, as well as an easy way for me to share things I love, or feel strongly about. I tend to talk about my kids a lot, and also my stupid ex, who remains one of my best friends though some days I don't know how. I also talk about stupid things with my chica Vix (@hitlerchan911).

This is a NSFW blog, and I do draw adult material and occasionally reblog something not suitable for all audiences. I usually try to tag things #nsfw, but sometimes things slip through the cracks because either I forget to tag it at first, or something is so mild to me that I forget it's not appropriate for everyone. I do plenty of SFW stuff, though!

My main gallery is at pewterkat.deviantart.com (semi-NSFW)
I am also on Weasyl: https://www.weasyl.com/~pewterkat (NSFW)
Fur Affinity, used mostly for commissions right now: furaffinity.net/user/pewterkat (NSFW)
For adopts, go to furaffinity.net/user/pewtersadoptables (NSFW)
Last but not least, if you're into Second Life, go check out the crappy content I make on my SL blog, pewterkat-on-sl.tumblr.com.
Please don't be afraid to ask for a commission from me. :)

Also, while I don't mind if you reblog, and reblogging is greatly encouraged, please don't deliberatly take and reupload my art without asking me first.

So it looks like WoW lore totally destroys the way I wanted to write my stories because several of these characters wouldn’t even reach adulthood for a few decades or more. Terrific.

officialwhitegirls:

when kids don’t listen to you and think its funny to disobey what youre telling them

image

megustathe:

avengersonna:

ohmygil:

twistedsickminded:

wherespauldoe:

I’VE NEVER WANTED A NIGHT LIGHT SO MUCH

WANT.


I heard you were talkin’ shit

Stop

BUT DID YOU SEE ME TALKING SHIT? No? Okay….

I just like how Iron Man’s makes it look like he was thrown into the wall

megustathe:

avengersonna:

ohmygil:

twistedsickminded:

wherespauldoe:

I’VE NEVER WANTED A NIGHT LIGHT SO MUCH

WANT.

image

I heard you were talkin’ shit

Stop

BUT DID YOU SEE ME TALKING SHIT? No? Okay….

I just like how Iron Man’s makes it look like he was thrown into the wall

sadhacker:

"you are too young to have an opinion" more like "im upset that children know more than me because i am a bigot"

devidsketchbook:

USUAL SUSPECTS BY JASON MARK

Batman Villains Re-Imagined in 1920s Style Mugshots 

Artwork by Jason Mark

vgjunk:

As mentioned in yesterday’s birthday article, Smash TV features a literal eye beam.

"Here’s lookin’ at you, kid!"

vgjunk:

As mentioned in yesterday’s birthday article, Smash TV features a literal eye beam.

"Here’s lookin’ at you, kid!"

The Alnwick Poison Garden is pretty much what you’d think it is: a garden full of plants that can kill you (among many other things). Some of the plants are so dangerous that they have to be kept behind bars. [x]

Wow, add one more place to the list of places I can’t take my kids.

Dem nightshade berries look mighty tasty.

(Source: bregma)

hitlerchan911:

thepeoplesrecord:

The 1% wants to ban sleeping in cars - it hurts their ‘quality of life’April 16, 2014
Across the United States, many local governments are responding to skyrocketing levels of inequality and the now decades-long crisis of homelessness among the very poor … by passing laws making it a crime to sleep in a parked car.
This happened most recently in Palo Alto, in California’s Silicon Valley, where new billionaires are seemingly minted every month – and where 92% of homeless people lack shelter of any kind. Dozens of cities have passed similar anti-homeless laws. The largest of them is Los Angeles, the longtime unofficial “homeless capital of America”, where lawyers are currently defending a similar vehicle-sleeping law before a skeptical federal appellate court. Laws against sleeping on sidewalks or in cars are called “quality of life” laws. But they certainly don’t protect the quality of life of the poor.
To be sure, people living in cars cannot be the best neighbors. Some people are able to acquire old and ugly – but still functioning – recreational vehicles with bathrooms; others do the best they can. These same cities have resisted efforts to provide more public toilet facilities, often on the grounds that this will make their city a “magnet” for homeless people from other cities. As a result, anti-homeless ordinances often spread to adjacent cities, leaving entire regions without public facilities of any kind.
Their hope, of course, is that homeless people will go elsewhere, despite the fact that the great majority of homeless people are trying to survive in the same communities in which they were last housed – and where they still maintain connections. Americans sleeping in their own cars literally have nowhere to go.
Indeed, nearly all homelessness in the US begins with a loss of income and an eviction for nonpayment of rent – a rent set entirely by market forces. The waiting lists are years long for the tiny fraction of housing with government subsidies. And rents have risen dramatically in the past two years, in part because long-time tenants must now compete with the millions of former homeowners who lost their homes in the Great Recession.
The paths from eviction to homelessness follow familiar patterns. For the completely destitute without family or friends able to help, that path leads more or less directly to the streets. For those slightly better off, unemployment and the exhaustion of meager savings – along with the good graces of family and friends – eventually leaves people with only two alternatives: a shelter cot or their old automobile.
However, in places like Los Angeles, the shelters are pretty much always full. Between 2011 and 2013, the number of unsheltered homeless people increased by 67%. In Palo Alto last year, there were 12 shelter beds for 157 homeless individuals. Homeless people in these cities do have choices: they can choose to sleep in a doorway, on a sidewalk, in a park, under a bridge or overpass, or – if they are relatively lucky – in a car. But these cities have ordinances that make all of those choices a criminal offense. The car is the best of bad options, now common enough that local bureaucrats have devised a new, if oxymoronic, term – the “vehicularly housed”.
People sleeping in cars try to find legal, nighttime parking places, where they will be less apparent and arouse the least hostility. But cities like Palo Alto and Los Angeles often forbid parking between 2am and 5am in commercial areas, where police write expensive tickets and arrest and impound the vehicles of repeat offenders. That leaves residential areas, where overnight street parking cannot, as a practical matter, be prohibited.
One finds the “vehicularly housed” in virtually every neighborhood, including my own. But the animus that drives anti-homeless laws seems to be greatest in the wealthiest cities, like Palo Alto, which has probably spawned more per-capita fortunes than any city on Earth, and in the more recently gentrified areas like Los Angeles’ Venice. These places are ruled by majorities of “liberals” who decry, with increasing fervor, the rapid rise in economic inequality. Nationally, 90% of Democrats (and 45% of Republicans) believe the government should act to reduce the rich-poor gap.
It is easy to be opposed to inequality in the abstract. So why are Los Angeles and Palo Alto spending virtually none of their budgets on efforts to provide housing for the very poor and homeless? When the most obvious evidence of inequality parks on their street, it appears, even liberals would rather just call the police. The word from the car: if you’re not going to do anything to help, please don’t make things worse.
Source

Let’s push all the homeless out instead of ya know making them not homeless.

Huh, feeling some guilt that you can’t pull a few hundred out of your pocket to help someone in need, rich people? Gotta make them go away so you can sleep at night?

hitlerchan911:

thepeoplesrecord:

The 1% wants to ban sleeping in cars - it hurts their ‘quality of life’
April 16, 2014

Across the United States, many local governments are responding to skyrocketing levels of inequality and the now decades-long crisis of homelessness among the very poor … by passing laws making it a crime to sleep in a parked car.

This happened most recently in Palo Alto, in California’s Silicon Valley, where new billionaires are seemingly minted every month – and where 92% of homeless people lack shelter of any kind. Dozens of cities have passed similar anti-homeless laws. The largest of them is Los Angeles, the longtime unofficial “homeless capital of America”, where lawyers are currently defending a similar vehicle-sleeping law before a skeptical federal appellate court. Laws against sleeping on sidewalks or in cars are called “quality of life” laws. But they certainly don’t protect the quality of life of the poor.

To be sure, people living in cars cannot be the best neighbors. Some people are able to acquire old and ugly – but still functioning – recreational vehicles with bathrooms; others do the best they can. These same cities have resisted efforts to provide more public toilet facilities, often on the grounds that this will make their city a “magnet” for homeless people from other cities. As a result, anti-homeless ordinances often spread to adjacent cities, leaving entire regions without public facilities of any kind.

Their hope, of course, is that homeless people will go elsewhere, despite the fact that the great majority of homeless people are trying to survive in the same communities in which they were last housed – and where they still maintain connections. Americans sleeping in their own cars literally have nowhere to go.

Indeed, nearly all homelessness in the US begins with a loss of income and an eviction for nonpayment of rent – a rent set entirely by market forces. The waiting lists are years long for the tiny fraction of housing with government subsidies. And rents have risen dramatically in the past two years, in part because long-time tenants must now compete with the millions of former homeowners who lost their homes in the Great Recession.

The paths from eviction to homelessness follow familiar patterns. For the completely destitute without family or friends able to help, that path leads more or less directly to the streets. For those slightly better off, unemployment and the exhaustion of meager savings – along with the good graces of family and friends – eventually leaves people with only two alternatives: a shelter cot or their old automobile.

However, in places like Los Angeles, the shelters are pretty much always full. Between 2011 and 2013, the number of unsheltered homeless people increased by 67%. In Palo Alto last year, there were 12 shelter beds for 157 homeless individuals. Homeless people in these cities do have choices: they can choose to sleep in a doorway, on a sidewalk, in a park, under a bridge or overpass, or – if they are relatively lucky – in a car. But these cities have ordinances that make all of those choices a criminal offense. The car is the best of bad options, now common enough that local bureaucrats have devised a new, if oxymoronic, term – the “vehicularly housed”.

People sleeping in cars try to find legal, nighttime parking places, where they will be less apparent and arouse the least hostility. But cities like Palo Alto and Los Angeles often forbid parking between 2am and 5am in commercial areas, where police write expensive tickets and arrest and impound the vehicles of repeat offenders. That leaves residential areas, where overnight street parking cannot, as a practical matter, be prohibited.

One finds the “vehicularly housed” in virtually every neighborhood, including my own. But the animus that drives anti-homeless laws seems to be greatest in the wealthiest cities, like Palo Alto, which has probably spawned more per-capita fortunes than any city on Earth, and in the more recently gentrified areas like Los Angeles’ Venice. These places are ruled by majorities of “liberals” who decry, with increasing fervor, the rapid rise in economic inequality. Nationally, 90% of Democrats (and 45% of Republicans) believe the government should act to reduce the rich-poor gap.

It is easy to be opposed to inequality in the abstract. So why are Los Angeles and Palo Alto spending virtually none of their budgets on efforts to provide housing for the very poor and homeless? When the most obvious evidence of inequality parks on their street, it appears, even liberals would rather just call the police. The word from the car: if you’re not going to do anything to help, please don’t make things worse.

Source

Let’s push all the homeless out instead of ya know making them not homeless.

Huh, feeling some guilt that you can’t pull a few hundred out of your pocket to help someone in need, rich people? Gotta make them go away so you can sleep at night?

introverted-triad:

viviku:

vandigo:

redsuns-n-orangemoons:

shybairnsget-nowt:

americas-liberty:

Students Fed Up With Michelle Obama’s School Lunch Overhaul — Menu-Item Snapshots Spell Out Why

Wow that is depressing. 

okay but is that michelle’s fault for pushing for healtheir lunches or is it school districts’ faults for cutting corner by cutting calories but not making lunch any healthier?

let’s look into it.

Yes, thank you. Because yes she is pushing for a healthier lunch, but the schools still value football over feeding their students, which means that instead of providing enough healthy food to keep their students from starving, they are cutting down the amount of food available to fit within the caloric requirements … while then taking the money they saved to re-sod the football field for the third year in a row. Maybe new uniforms.

thank you for adding that. i really really doubted michelle wanted this to happen.

Look at those assholes. Jesus. Obviously this is not what she wanted.

Don’t call the kids assholes when the school is feeding them that it’s Michelle Obama who wanted this instead of a nourishing lunch so they can actually think.

strideypoo:

hitlerchan911:

jackthemother:

So this happened on facebook today….

Why did she have to comment 6 times tho

at first I thought I was gonna hate that chic who left those 6 comments but I learned something today and found that to be kind of interesting. now I can spot the fakers.

Ok, but it’s not necessarily faking. Though that would depend on the girl. Some are actually talented and are doing it purely for your benefit.

That aside, first world women are extremely ignorant about how their body works, due to all the fucking taboos surrounding sex. I learned things while reading pregnancy books that we should honestly be taught at a younger age. It would probably make us better able to have children  once we get to that point, with fewer complications.

sammneiland:

xpsychohogx:

korillaz:

are you fucking kidding me  

gO FIX IT

rolls up sleeves.

strideypoo:

sniperj0e:

pros of werewolf boyfriend:

  • happy with any present as long as its chewable
  • very very excited to see you after any period of time apart
  • will lie in your bed and keep you warm whenever you take a nap
  • growls at jerks, may eat them

cons of werewolf boyfriend:

dimma-dont:

”am i dying or just having cramps” -a novel written by me.

yofryman:

YO DEXTER WHAT DOES THIS FRIGGIN BUTTON DO

yofryman:

YO DEXTER WHAT DOES THIS FRIGGIN BUTTON DO